Home / The Latest New In Home-Based Business / Saving Money by Using a Geothermal System in Your Home

Saving Money by Using a Geothermal System in Your Home

Regardless of the weather, season, or location in the country where you live, the ground underneath your home constantly stays the same temperature of roughly 50 degrees Fahrenheit. A geothermal system uses this planetary trait to offer efficient heating and cooling in a reliable and environmentally sound way. With cost savings over a traditional forced air heating and cooling system, a geothermal system can pay for itself over time, substantially increase the value of your home, and often qualify you for tax credits.

Let the Earth’s Temperature Do the Work

Geothermal systems take advantage of the fact that although air temperatures can fluctuate with the seasons — or even day to day —the ground underneath your home stays a nearly constant temperature year-round. By circulating water through pipes installed underground, a geothermal system can cool water in hot weather or heat water when the weather is cold outside to the temperature below the earth’s surface. This water heats or cools the air used by a heat pump to control the temperature in the home.

See That a Degree Saved Is a Penny Earned

Image via Flickr by USDAgov

A geothermal system saves homeowners and businesses money on heating and cooling costs by making use of the earth’s thermal properties. When temperatures reach 100 degrees outside, the water circulating underground chills as it passes through pipes and is then used to cool the air used by the air conditioner. Conversely, when the mercury falls and temperatures are below freezing outside, the water circulating through the ground gets heated and brings that heat into a house, lowering the amount of energy a homeowner must use to keep the interior pleasantly warm all winter.

Increase Your Home’s Value

Since a geothermal system requires drilling underground and more materials and labor to install than a conventional heating and cooling system, the system itself is often a more expensive option initially. However, due to its substantially increased efficiency, a geothermal system can begin helping people save money immediately upon its installation.

This month-to-month savings adds up, and most homeowners can expect the system to pay for itself in five to 10 years, depending on such factors as usage, the heating and cooling requirements of the space, and installation complexity. The increased efficiency, reliability, and reduced operating costs of a geothermal system can greatly add to the value of a home.

Cut Fossil Fuel Use

A geothermal system allows homeowners to significantly reduce their use of fossil fuels while keeping their homes comfortable throughout the year. All the air preheated or cooled by circulating water represents lower electricity usage and less carbon emitted into the environment. This reduction in carbon footprint accompanies not only a commensurate savings in cost, but also the knowledge that the savings result from an environmentally sustainable practice.

Homeowners with an interest in efficiently heating and cooling their homes in a reliable and environmentally friendly way are taking advantage of economical geothermal systems to keep comfortable inside regardless of the outside temperatures.



The post Saving Money by Using a Geothermal System in Your Home appeared first on Home Business Magazine.

Click Here For Original Source Of The Article

Ads by WOW TRK

Check Also

Movie or Miniseries: What’s the Best Way to Share Information with Your Readers?

The post Movie or Miniseries: What’s the Best Way to Share Information with Your Readers? appeared first on ProBlogger.

This post is based on episode 149 of the ProBlogger podcast. So you’ve come up with a great idea for a blog post. It’s a great topic, has plenty of depth, and will boost your reputation as an authority in your niche. But do it justice you need to cover a lot ...more

The post Movie or Miniseries: What’s the Best Way to Share Information with Your Readers? appeared first on ProBlogger.

      

css.php